Article

SurfAid's Mentawai Tsunami Update

| posted on November 08, 2010

Just when it seemed that things couldn’t get any worse for residents of the Mentawai Islands, things got worse. The tsunami followed the earthquake. Then the cyclone followed the tsunami, water following water, land that was once dry flooded first from the sea and now from the air. An already cruel ocean has turned cruel once again, cutting off isolated villages from aid. Facing 30-knot winds, sheets of rain, and 12-foot seas, most aid boats turned back. But the surfers did not. Thanks to the tenacity of SurfAid and various charter boats, the relief effort continues.

SurfAid updates us on what’s been done, what still needs doing, and
how you can help:

Children in Limu village helped carry the emergency supplies from the SurfAid tin boat. Photo: Howe/SurfAid

Children in Limu village helped carry the emergency supplies from the SurfAid tin boat. Photo: Howe/SurfAid

The Huey surf charter boat battles through 3 - 4 metre (10 - 12 foot) seas. SurfAid's Tom Plummer said the bow was buried six times with green water coming over the windscreen. Photo. Sped

The Huey surf charter boat battles through 10- to 12-foot seas. SurfAid's Tom Plummer said the bow was buried six times with green water coming over the windscreen. Photo: Sped

 Displaced villagers in Eruparaboat camp. Salvaged wooden slats   separate families from the mud. Families are traumatised by the   tsunami and fear another one. Photo: Howe/SurfAid

Displaced villagers in Eruparaboat camp. Salvaged wooden slats separate families from the mud. Families are traumatized by the tsunami and fear another one. Photo: Howe/SurfAid

The crew of Indies Trader IV caught a giant trevally for families in   Limosau while enroute to delivering them aid. Photo: Howe/SurfAid