Rob Gilley

SURFER Contributor

10.24.14

Opinion

Does Localism “Work”?

A cost benefit analysis

From 30 years of observing guarded lineups across the globe, the first thing I should have told him is that localism is an inexact science. Regardless of how close you live to a spot, or how many years you’ve put in, or how well you follow the unspoken rules, or how good of a surfer you are, you are still subject to the whims and moods of the presiding alpha males—often hair-trigger snap-cases that hand out arbitrary verbal or physical punishment at a moment’s notice. There are never any ironclad guarantees of pecking order, etiquette, or safety. It’s frontier justice, in the loosest way.

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9.24.14

The Culture

Surf Craft Comes to San Diego

A look at the Surf Craft exhibition at the Mingei Museum in Balboa Park

But my dilettante ways exist independently from appreciation, and currently there’s no better place to appreciate the evolution of surfboard design than the Mingei Museum in Balboa Park, San Diego. From now until January 11, 2015 you will find a comprehensive—and in certain parts of the museum, esoteric—collection of surf vehicles put together by none other than Richard Kenvin. Spread out and suspended amongst the austere Mingei setting are paipos and spoons, asymmetricals and boogie boards, fish and stingers, Simmons twin fins and TOMO MPHs.

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7.17.14

The Culture

Spacek’s Scrimshaw

How Peter Spacek is using surfboards to revive a lost art form

The mere mention of the word “scrimshaw” can raise hackles on the necks of some. It’s an art form stigmatized by the medium it was traditionally practiced on: whale bone and tusk ivory—two parcels of a modern no man’s land. But despite the art form's unsavory origins, anyone who has seen scrimshaw knows how masterful and nuanced these inked etchings—these incredibly detailed pieces of storytelling micro-sculpture—often were. And now the world—or the surf world at least—can rediscover scrimshaw through the impressive, guilt-free work of Peter Spacek.

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7.2.14

Photo Blog

In Focus

The Wedge, California

Even with super-telephoto lenses, foreground or background can really help a photograph. Like surfing, correct positioning is the key to success.

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6.30.14

Design Forum

Rise of the Stub

Rob Machado and the search for the world’s most versatile surfboard

Rob may have refined the stub, but the truth is that surfers have been experimenting with stub-like designs for decades. In fact, the history of the stub is rich.

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6.26.14

Photo Blog

In Focus

Lower Trestles

Non-center/rule of thirds framing is a skill that often separates a professional from an amateur photograph. This type of approach can add visual tension to a scene, and can contextualize things in a positive way.

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6.19.14

Photo Blog

In Focus

Central California

In general, the more perfect and groomed the waves are, the smaller the lens you can, and probably should, use. Also, the use of 100VS in this situation was intended to exploit the warm sunset tones present in the scene.

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6.10.14

Photo Blog

In Focus

Mike Losness in Oceanside, California

A professional photographer needs to be as ready as possible for unexpected, photogenic situations. Having an extra camera body with a different lens on it is a good means to this end. In this particular situation, a backed-off view of a smoke-filled horizon helped provide an interesting duality.

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5.18.14

Features

People Who Surf

Rob Gilley's tribute to former SURFER Editor Steve Hawk

First, Steve stepped into the literary bouncer role with remorseless panache. Like a mulleted Patrick Swayze, he starting kicking ass left and right. If your prose didn’t cut it, you weren’t getting in the magazine. For example, over the years he rebuffed some of my own submissions with terms like “juvenile” (right cross), “semi-scholastic” (Rocky Balboa body-blow), and my personal favorite, “hermaphroditic” (Bruce Lee neck-stomp).

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5.8.14

Photo Blog

In Focus

Red Tide in Carlsbad, California

It wasn’t until the late 2000s introduction of ultra-low light sensors that a phenomenon like Red Tide could properly be captured. Previous issues with reciprocity failure and long exposure motion faded away, and allowed for new possibilities.

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